A Quick Guide to Different Types of Teeth

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If you run your tongue over your teeth, you can feel that they are all different shapes and sizes. Although your teeth play a major role in your appearance and in allowing you to pronounce your words correctly, their main purpose is to tear and shred your food so that you can consume it. Each tooth is different because each serves a specific purpose in chewing. Therefore, if you lose one or more, then your replacement teeth should be carefully designed to function the way the original tooth was meant to.

Incisors – for Biting

Beginning in the front and center of your mouth, your incisors are the four teeth on top and the four teeth on the bottom. Usually the first to come into contact with your food, the incisors are used to bite off manageable chunks of sustenance. Incisors are also the first teeth to erupt, the primary (baby) set typically appearing around the age of six months.

Canines – for Ripping and Tearing

Moving away from the incisors, your next teeth are canines. Your four canines are your sharpest teeth, used for ripping and tearing food, and are the next to develop. Primary sets of canines usually appear between 16 and 20 months of age.

Bicuspids – for Chewing/Grinding

Bicuspids, commonly called premolars, are next in line and are used for chewing and grinding food for easier digestion. A healthy mouth consists of four bicuspids on either side of your mouth (eight total), the first of which begin to appear at around age ten.

Molars – also for Chewing/Grinding

Two sets of molars, or primary molars, are also used for chewing and grinding, ensuring that your meal is properly prepared for digestion. A third set of molars, usually referred to as wisdom teeth, are the last teeth to develop, and in some cases, never develop at all. In many instances, the development of wisdom teeth can cause crowding, which can lead to a number of various dental problems. Unlike other types of teeth, third molars do not need to be replaced if lost or extracted.

Learn More About Caring for and Replacing Your Teeth

Today’s modern dental prostheses are custom-designed to mimic any lost tooth, regardless of what type of tooth it is. To learn more, or to schedule a dental implant consultation, call Just Wright Dental Surgery Center in Waxahachie, TX, today at (469) 732-1987. We also proudly serve patients from Navarro County, TX, and the surrounding communities, including Corsicana, Mildred, Eureka, Ennis, Fairfield, Teague, Blooming Grove, Dawson, Hubbard, Hillsboro, Mexia, Groesbeck, Kerens, Malakoff, Rice, Centerville, Buffalo, and Athens.

Is Smokeless Tobacco Safer than Smoking?

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These days, the dangers of smoking are no longer a mystery, and a wealth of information regarding the harmful effects of tobacco use is available to the public eye. Nevertheless, tobacco use remains a problematic habit for many people, even those who wish to quit but can’t seem to succeed. In some cases, people may believe that using smokeless tobacco instead of smoking a cigarette is good way to avoid the dangers of smoking. The truth, however, is that tobacco use is dangerous to your oral and overall health no matter what form it takes.

Tobacco in All Forms is Dangerous

Like the rest of your body, your mouth is comprised mainly of living tissues that require an ample supply of oxygenated blood to function properly. Smoking inhibits oxygen flow, affecting your tissues’ ability to function and heal properly. Smoking and/or chewing tobacco significantly increases your risk of developing dental diseases like gum disease that destroy your mouth’s foundation.

Also, the habit can restrict your body’s natural healing mechanisms, increasing the damage that these issues can wreak on your oral health. Not to mention, smokeless tobacco is also linked to some of the most aggressive forms of oral cancer, which affects around 42,000 new patients every year.

Not a Safer Choice

While oxygen deprivation is a serious threat to healthy tissue, the chemicals in smokeless tobacco can pose a greater risk to your oral and physical health. Below are just a few of the over 2,000 chemical compounds found in smokeless tobacco and their more common uses and risks;

  • Cadmium—a corrosive agent found in battery acid

  • Formaldehyde—embalming fluid

  • Fiberglass and sand—abrasives that can seriously damage your teeth and gums

  • Lead—poisonous metal

  • Nicotine—an addictive substance

Learn More About Keeping Your Smile Safe

With the dangers that it poses to your oral and overall health, the only safe option is to avoid tobacco use altogether in any and all forms. To learn more, call Just Wright Dental Surgery Center in Waxahachie, TX, today at (469) 732-1987. We also proudly serve patients from Navarro County, TX, and the surrounding communities, including Corsicana, Mildred, Eureka, Ennis, Fairfield, Teague, Blooming Grove, Dawson, Hubbard, Hillsboro, Mexia, Groesbeck, Kerens, Malakoff, Rice, Centerville, Buffalo, and Athens.

Tips to Care for Your Dental Implants

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Caring for your smile properly can help you prevent tooth loss, but if you do lose one or more teeth, then you can still preserve your smile by replacing them with dental implants. Like your natural teeth, however, implants will only last if you take good care of them, including practicing good home hygiene and visiting your dentist regularly for checkups and cleanings. To improve the results of your treatment, we offer a few tips to care for your dental implants the way they’re meant to be cared for, both at home and at our office.

Brush and floss them like natural teeth

The good thing about implant restorations is that they closely mimic natural, healthy teeth, down to the roots that support them. Implant posts, which resemble tooth roots, are placed in the jawbone and utilized to support a crown, bridge, or denture. Therefore, caring for them is similar to caring for your natural teeth—be sure to brush and floss at least twice every day to prevent plaque buildup that could lead to serious oral health concerns.

Treat dental issues as soon as they appear.

Restorations supported by dental implants are crafted from dental materials like porcelain, which are not susceptible to tooth decay. However, the gums that surround and support your implants can still be susceptible to gum disease, which develops from excessive oral bacteria. Gum disease erodes the tissues and jawbone structures that support your teeth—and your dental implants—and if not treated, it can lead to the shifting and failure of your dental implants. If your dentist notices the development of gum disease during your routine examination, then don’t hesitate to receive treatment as soon as possible to avoid the condition from complicating your implant restoration.

Take Good Care of Your Implants and Your Smile

Taking good care of your dental implants can help ensure the long-term health, beauty, and integrity of your new smile! To schedule a consultation with Dr. Wright, call Just Wright Dental Surgery Center in Waxahachie, TX, today at (469) 732-1987. We also proudly serve patients from Navarro County, TX, and the surrounding communities, including Corsicana, Mildred, Eureka, Ennis, Fairfield, Teague, Blooming Grove, Dawson, Hubbard, Hillsboro, Mexia, Groesbeck, Kerens, Malakoff, Rice, Centerville, Buffalo, and Athens.

The Three Implant Components

implantMost people have heard about dental implants but unless you’ve had one you may not know much about them. An implant is the most realistic way to replace a missing tooth. Unlike a bridge or denture which set on the gum, an implant requires a surgical procedure to “implant” a post, or prosthetic tooth root, into your jawbone. An implant consists of three components.

The Three Components

Prosthetic tooth root: The prosthetic tooth root is the first component of an implant. It is a small titanium post that is surgically placed into the jawbone to take the place of the missing root. Human bone fuses to titanium creating a strong and stable bond. The implant post is set into the jaw, but the top remains even with your gum.

The abutment: Next, is the abutment, which may be made of titanium, gold, or porcelain. The abutment is screwed to the implant post.  While the implant post is under the gum, the abutment rises above the gumline and holds the dental crown.

The restoration: Finally comes the restoration which is usually a dental crown (for a single implant), but can also be a partial or complete denture, or a dental bridge.  The crown is made of porcelain or porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM).  If the implant is a molar and the patient grinds and clenches, the restoration may be an all-metal crown. The crown, or other restoration, is bonded (cemented) onto the abutment, and your implant is complete.

Call Just Wright Dental Surgery Center in Waxahachie, TX, Today!

At Just Wright Dental Surgery Center, our priority is ensuring that every visit is a comfortable and friendly experience, and that all of our patients understand every stage of their diagnosis, planning, and treatment. With extensive experience in placing, restoring, and maintaining dental implants, Dr. Wright and our team can walk you through every stage of the dental implant process. We also specialize in helping patients with medical considerations that can affect their oral and overall health, such as cancer, chemotherapy and radiation treatment, and recovery from drug addiction. Schedule your consultation with Dr. Justin Wright and our team by calling our dental implant office in Waxahachie, TX, today at (903) 225-2221.